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Church Capital Campaigns

31 Jul. 2012 Posted by Denis Greene in Church Capital Campaigns

The Importance of Thanks in Capital Campaigns

Mike Quinn [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsChurch Development shares a reminder of the importance of thanks in all things, including capital campaign giving.

“…give thanks to all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.” ~1 Thessalonians 5:18 (NIV)

The Bible has a lot to say about thankfulness. The overarching theme: Give thanks in everything.

With that in mind, it should be no surprise that giving thanks is an important part of a capital campaign. A thank you gift after a capital campaign or annual fund campaign is the final impression of the campaign for the giver. A thank you gift with spiritual or sentimental significance can help commemorate this time.

19 Apr. 2012 Posted by Denis Greene in Church Capital Campaigns

Increased Giving Improves the Immune System

Church Development shares how tithers decide what they will give and a couple of interesting side effects of increased giving.

In wrapping up this series on the effectiveness of prayer-based capital campaigns, there are a couple of minor points I’d like to close with:

First, even though tithers (those who give 10%+ of their income), on average, only make up 5% of your church, a Church Development study found that the majority of them make a prayer-based decision on what they will give. To me, it makes sense to take what works with them and offer it to the whole church.

Secondly, Give to Live author Gregory Lawson reported that, in a study of people who deliberately decided to give more than 2% of their income (what the average churchgoer gives) to any charity, the following was reported:

17 Apr. 2012 Posted by Denis Greene in Church Capital Campaigns

Teaching Methods for Prayer and Discernment in Stewardship Campaigns

Church Development shares some teaching methods that promote prayer and discernment in giving.

In continuing to discuss the power of prayer-based capital campaigns, there are a few key teaching points I’d like to share. Although I’ve covered the importance of teaching on stewardship before, the following methods have an emphasis on prayer and discernment:

12 Apr. 2012 Posted by Denis Greene in Church Capital Campaigns

The Heart of Prayer and Discernment in Capital Campaigns

Church Development shares the main goal in having prayer and discernment be a key part of capital campaigns: To make the love of God the end of all our actions.

Although last time I shared that Church Development’s prayer-based capital campaigns raise almost 80% more than secular (ask-based) capital campaigns (with a 15% higher pledge collection rate), I want to talk about the heart of why the decision to give should be based on prayer, not pressure:

For many Christians, prayer falls mainly into the categories of praise and worship or need and supplication. Prayer to seek God’s will in decision making is complex and rare. However, if an individual learns to discern as part of their decision-making process, his or her life will be transformed. No longer are decisions based on short-term self-interest, but they become more altruistic.

10 Apr. 2012 Posted by Denis Greene in Church Capital Campaigns

Improved Stewardship Through Prayer and Discernment

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Duerer-Prayer.jpgChurch Development compares secular (ask-based) capital campaigns to prayer-based capital campaigns.

As much as I love research, I know that statistics aren’t the most spiritual thing for pastors. With that in mind, I wanted to have a brief series on prayer statistics as they relate to capital campaigns. While there are always enough studies out there to find what you want to find, I still take great encouragement in that God’s power shows up everywhere—even in the numbers.

For example, an analysis of 39 Commerce Bank loans to protestant churches between 2000 and 2006 revealed the following:

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